In the future, we will not publish Letters in which authors argue that an individual accused or found guilty of harassment is likely innocent because others have interacted with that person without incident; this argument is logically flawed. In addition, although some information about a person’s scientific achievements is at times necessary to establish context, we will not publish Letters in which authors argue that professional achievements have any bearing at all on the likelihood that the individual engaged in harassment.

Source: Editor’s note: Harassment policy | Science

Via: After Facing Criticism, a Top Scientific Journal Says: No More ‘But Look What Good He’s Done’ – Pacific Standard

The look what good they’ve done argument, on the other hand, is “bad logic” and too common, says Robin Leeds, who specializes in crisis communication and founded a political consulting firm, Winning Strategies LLC. “It’s really a distraction strategy,” she says, “that essentially demonstrates non-belief in the victim.”

Source: After Facing Criticism, a Top Scientific Journal Says: No More ‘But Look What Good He’s Done’ – Pacific Standard

Any turn towards research that completely dismisses the social sciences in such casual fashion simply sneaks values in through the back door under the pretense of being neutral science. Sociology tells us lots about the workings of power, about the relation between our individual lives and larger structures, making it invaluable for understanding education. However, we don’t see many right wing sociologists, and Nigel Dodd argues that’s down to epistemological reasons. Sociologists favor “accounts of the world that emphasize structure and social process, while right-leaning people favor accounts that emphasize “freedom of choice and agency”.

Source: What kinds of research matter to educators? – Long View on Education