Aww. I love these affirmations from neurowonderful.

  • Your stims are stupendous; your happy makes me happy
    • I would talk on the phone for you; please don’t make me
    • You’re on my red list; let’s get out of here
    • I want to know everything about you; do you mind if I take notes?
    • I want to spend time in parallel existence with you; let’s be alone together
    • Your echolalia is enchanting; let’s back and forth

I updated “Interaction Badges: Opportunity but Not Pressure” with a selection from “History of ANI” as featured in “Loud Hands: Autistic People, Speaking”.

“Opportunity but not pressure” is a core principle for all Autreat activities: attendance at presentations, informal discussions that are held in the evenings, swimming and other recreational activities, socializing, meals (people who prefer to make their own meal arrangements are able to register for Autreat without paying for Autreat meals), on-site lodging (people who prefer to stay at an off-site hotel can register for Autreat at a commuter rate)—all participation is purely voluntary.

Freedom from pressures and expectations 

For some autistic people attending Autreat, the sudden absence of pressures and expectations to behave in certain ways can be quite disorienting at first. NT people are often disoriented as well, and may experience culture shock. One NT attendee described feeling unsure of how to behave and how to relate to people, confused about how to interpret other people’s behavior, and anxious that he might offend people without realizing it (personal communication). In other words, he was able to experience at Autreat some of the same social confusion and discomfort that autistic people frequently experience in NT society. While this can be somewhat disturbing, a number of NT people have reported that it was a valuable experience that helped them to better understand what autistic people go through on a daily basis.

The absence of any expectation or pressure to socialize, and the knowledge that they’re free to withdraw at any time, seem to free many autistic people to want to socialize.”

Source: History of ANI

Featured in: Loud Hands: Autistic People, Speaking

Respect for each person’s solitude and personal space was essential, and the interaction badges allowed everyone to know at a glance who was open to talking. All of the conference events were optional, including the orientation itself; the overriding principle was “opportunity but not pressure.”

Source: Silberman, Steve. NeuroTribes: The Legacy of Autism and the Future of Neurodiversity (p. 448, 449). Penguin Publishing Group. Kindle Edition.

Via: Interaction Badges: Opportunity but Not Pressure